Thank you for your interest in PoliceWitness.com 
 
If you are reading this, you no doubt already recognise the importance and immense value a dash cam has in protecting your interests, reducing your insurance, and safeguarding your family. We seek to empower and protect our members on the road using dash cam technology, at home as part of our Community Watch programme and personally using our 999 emergency police app. 
 
 
In the event of an accident, or if someone needlessly puts you in harm’s way, how would you prove what happened?  
 
With no witnesses, the simple answer is, you couldn’t – it will be your word against theirs. The result, even with your no claims protected, is you will be asked to pay the excess on your policy (usually hundreds of pounds). But with a dash cam, the evidence is there for when you need it most. Did you know over 4 million people in the UK now use a dash cam to protect themselves? 
 
Thank you again for your interest in PoliceWitness.com. Your free detailed guide can be viewed here
 
For useful advice on the following topics, click on the links below: 

PROTECT YOUR HOME 

 
Read our hints and tips to protect your home, taking just a few steps can make a big difference in keeping your home safe from burglary: 
 
• Lock your doors and windows every time you leave the house, even when you're just out in the garden, remembering to double-lock UPVC doors  
• Hide all keys, including car keys, out of sight and away from the letterbox (remember a device could be used to hook keys through the letterbox) 
• Install a visual burglar alarm 
• Install good outside lighting 
• Get a neighbour to keep an eye on your property 
• Leave radios or lights in your house on a timer to make the property appear occupied 
• Make sure the fences around your garden are in good condition 
• Secure bikes at home by locking them to an immoveable object inside a locked shed or garage 
• Keep ladders and tools stored away; don't leave them outside where they could be used to break into your home 
• Ensure side gates are locked to prevent access to the rear of the property 
• Ensure rear fencing is in good repair 
• Improve natural surveillance at the front of your property i.e. trim high hedges 
• Mark your property with postcode and house number  
• Consider joining or forming a Neighbourhood Watch scheme  
• Remove valuables from view of ground floor windows 
• Store any high value items (i.e. jewellery, passports) in a properly secured safe or bank vault 

PROTECT YOUR VEHICLE 

Most vehicle crime is preventable, here are some tips for you: 
 
• Remove everything from the car; don't even leave a jacket where it can be seen 
• Close the sunroof along with the windows when you leave 
• Not storing things in the boot; take them with you 
• Store car ownership information in your home, not your car 
• Having a routine to ensure you always take the keys out of the ignition 
• Take removable stereos and sat nav equipment with you 
• In addition, using secure (theft resistant) number plates can make your plates less attractive to thieves 
• Where you park can make a big difference to the safety of your car and your belongings. Look out for car parks approved by the police Safer Parking scheme. You can find them by looking for their distinctive 'Park Mark' signs. 

GOING ON HOLIDAY 

 
If you are going away on holiday find out how you can protect your home whilst you are away: 
• Use automatic timer-switches to turn your lights and radios on when it goes dark 
• Cancel any newspaper or milk deliveries 
• Use the Royal Mail's 'keepsafe' service - they keep your mail for up to 2 months while you're away.  
• Trusted neighbours may be able to help you by collecting your post, opening and closing curtains and they could park their car on your driveway 
• Avoid discussing holiday plans on public social networking sites - burglars can use any information you post on there to their advantage 

PROTECT YOUR BIKE 

 
Bicycles can be some of the easiest vehicles for thieves and vandals to target. Protect yourself by following some simple steps: 
 
• Get a good bike lock. A heavy-duty bike lock can make a thief’s job more difficult, with the result that they abandon attempts to steal your bike or move onto a bike with a less secure lock. 
• Lock your bike to something secure, even if only for a few minutes and avoid isolated places - leave your bike where a potential thief can be seen 
• Lock up removable parts (e.g. wheels) and take light fittings with you 
• Have your bike's frame security-marked or engraved 
• Take a clear colour photograph of your bike and make a written record of its description, including any unique features 
• At home, keep your bike in a secure garage or shed and keep the door locked 
• Marking your bike with a unique code ensures that Police will be able to trace your bike back to you if it is stolen and recovered. BikeRegister is a Police -approved marking scheme Service’s preferred bike marking product. If you are marking your bike yourself: 
• ensure the security mark is clearly visible. This in itself will act as a deterrent to bike thieves. 
• apply a tamper-proof sticker to the frame, warning that the bike has been marked 
• Make sure you register the bike online at BikeRegister and download a registration log book, proving ownership. 
 
Insure it 
• A bike can cost as much as an item of jewellery, an antique or a painting so make sure you are well covered by insurance in case of theft. 
• Check whether your home contents insurance covers your bike. Make sure it covers you for thefts outside the home too. If your bicycle is particularly valuable you may need to insure it separately. 
 
Out and about 
Bike thefts can occur at any time - day or night. A growing trend is that thieves are stealing certain makes and models to order. 
• Park your bike in a well-lit area, where it can be easily seen by passers-by. 
• Lock both wheels and the frame of your bike to a cycle stand or other immoveable object. Use designated parking areas where possible. 
• Make sure the locks go through the bike frame as well as both wheels and the post you are securing it to. Otherwise, a thief may steal the bike and leave the wheels behind. Also, make sure it isn’t possible to cut through the post, or for the bike to be lifted up over the top of it. 
• Ensure your lock doesn’t touch the ground, otherwise it is easy for a thief to sledgehammer it off. 
• Take any removable items with you such as wheels, lights, baskets and saddle. 
• Don’t park in the same place every day. If bike thieves are stealing to order, they are more likely to target you if they know where you will be. 
 
At home 
More than half of bikes are stolen from home. Reduce the chances of this happening by: 
• storing your bike in a locked shed or garage 
• keeping it out of view 
• securing it to an immovable object. 
 
Follow the Three R’s :– 
(as recommended by the Metropolitan Police Service) 
 
Record 
• Keep a record of the frame number, make and any other marks that can identify your bike if it is stolen. 
• Take a photo of the bike and write a description of it, so you can describe it accurately if it does get stolen. 
 
Register 
• Register your bike details onto BikeRegister.com. By marking and registering your bike you stand a chance that the police will be able to return it to you if it is stolen and recovered. 
 
Report 
• More and more marked bikes are being recovered and returned to their rightful owners, so if your bike is stolen you should definitely report it to the police. 
• You can report the theft online (www.online.police.uk), by phone or in person at your local police station. 
• Ask for your CAD (Computer Aided Despatch) or CRIS (Crime Reference Information System) number. This will help you trace the progress of your case and may be needed for your insurance claim. 

PROTECT YOUR MOBILE 

 
Knowing how to protect your mobile and keep it safe will save you a lot of inconvenience and stress: 
 
• If you're not making a call, make sure that your phone is hidden away 
• Keep it in one of your front pockets or inside a bag 
• Don't attach it to your belt or around your neck 
• If you're making a call on your mobile in a public area, make sure you always keep an eye on what's going on around you 
• Try to avoid using your mobile phone in public at night. If you do have to use your phone, try to find an area that's well-lit 
• Avoid getting out your phone at train stations and bus stops as these are areas that thieves target 
• Use the security features provided 
• Be aware of your surroundings 
• Know how to identify it when the phone is stolen 
Security features 
• Most mobile phones have a range of security features that are intended to stop anyone else accessing and using them should they be stolen. These security features include: 
• requiring access control such as a unique code (a PIN, password or some form of pattern) or biometric authentication (such as fingerprint or facial recognition) to be entered on the user interface of your handset to unlock it 
• tracing the location of your handset using a remote service 
• wiping data from, or locking your handset remotely (for example, by using another internet enabled device) 
• a function to display a home/lock screen message to someone who may find your handset to help you recover it. 
• preventing thieves from simply resetting your handset to its factory setting in order to bypass any unique codes or other security features that you are using to protect your handset 
• However, these features will only protect your mobile phone if you have them switched on 

PROTECT YOURSELF 

Here we look at your personal safety, on public transport, out in public or in your own home: 
 
Phone Home 
• Have you ever been stuck, needing to ring home but haven’t got any money? The BT “Phone Home” charge card is a wallet sized card which allows you to make calls from all public and private phones charging the call to your home phone bill.  
 
Self Defence 
• It is always sensible to think about what you would do if you were physically attacked. Are you capable of fighting back or would you co-operate to avoid any further harm?  
• Attacks and rapes by an unknown assailant are still very rare. Although it is impossible to comment on every possible situation, it will probably be better if you try to diffuse the situation instead of meeting violence with violence. 
• Only you can decide whether to fight back or ‘play dead’, and much will depend on the circumstances in which you find yourself. What’s best for one person in a given situation will be different for another or for that person in different circumstances. 
• If someone is trying to snatch your bag, be prepared to let it go as you may get hurt trying to hold on to it. Try to get a description of the attacker and tell the police immediately. 
 
Shout!! 
• If you find yourself face to face with potential attacker, let them know what they are up against. Shout and scream as loud as you can. This is worth doing even if there is no one obvious around as you are likely to unnerve your assailant and frighten them off. 
 
Alarms 
• If you think that you may not have the confidence to shout or scream in this type of situation, then consider buying a personal attack alarm. Different types are available, the important point to stress is to take the opportunity to escape while your attacker is nursing injuries or startled by an alarm. 
 
Weapons 
• As you probably know, you are not allowed to carry a personal armoury of knives, knuckle-dusters or other weapons to defend yourself. However, a person being attacked has every right to defend themselves with reasonable force and with any means at their disposal. That includes keys, rings and hairsprays. 
• Having your car or house keys ready in your hand not only stops you being vulnerable while searching in a handbag or pocket, but could even be used to stop an attacker. 
 
Self Defence And The Law 
• The most important point to remember in the use of self-defence is whether what you do is reasonable in the circumstances. Under the Criminal law Act 1967 you may use reasonable force, depending on the circumstances, to prevent crime or arrest an offender. 
• If you are attacked you may defend yourself, but you may only do what is reasonably necessary. You are entitled to defend your family, your boss or your employee, or a stranger and his or her property. 
• However, where a person is merely trespassing, without using force, he or she must be asked to leave before force is used, and no more force than is necessary may be used. 
• In the case of self-defence you should be able to show that you did not ‘court’ a fight and that you were prepared to withdraw from the situation. 
 
If You’re Attacked 
• In summary: only fight if you really have to – someone’s bound to get hurt and it could possibly be you; try not to panic, just think clearly about how to react; make as much noise as possible and yell for help at the top of your voice. 
• You are allowed to use reasonable force to defend yourself – but don’t be a hero. It’s better just to have something taken than to be beaten up as well. 
 
Be Wise, Be Confident 
• Recent studies considered the sort of person who becomes a victim of sexual assault or robbery. The offenders questioned did not choose people who had projected an air of self-confidence and walked with purpose. They picked, instead, on people who appeared timid, shy and vulnerable: in other words, an easy target. 
• Remain aware of your surroundings – it’s very difficult to stay ‘in touch’ if, for example, you’re listening to a personal stereo. 
• Always letting someone know where you are, especially if your plans change isn’t just for children. Adults should do it too – even professionals such as police officers and members of the armed forces keep someone informed.  
• Always trust your instincts. If you have a ‘funny feeling’ about someone or something, don’t ignore it – act on it! 
• Remember alcohol and drugs dull your reflexes – no matter how little you’ve had. 
Look confident. Robbers and bullies tend to choose victims who look like an easy target. It’s a fine line, though – don’t look as if you’re looking for a fight. 
• Avoid danger spots like quiet or badly lit alleyways, subways or deserted car parks. Walk down the middle of the pavement if the street is deserted. 
• Don’t flaunt your wealth! Designer labels may look good, but are very attractive to a robber. Cover jewellery and hide your wallet or purse. 
• If you do have to pass danger spots, think about what you’d do if you felt threatened – the best bet is to get to a public place like a garage or shop. 
• Whenever possible, walk with a friend or stay near a group of people. 
• Avoid passing stationary cars with their engines running and people sitting in them. 
• Try to keep both hands free and don’t walk with your hands in your pockets. 
• Avoid carrying bags in your hands – use a rucksack or bum-bag. 
 
Staying safe from robbery 
• If you have to walk alone at night take extra care. Stay on roads that are well lit and relatively busy 
• Plan your route in advance 
• Avoid short cuts that involve alleyways or walking across parks or commons unless they are well-lit 
• If you're carrying a bag, try to have it across your chest and keep your hand over the fastening 
• Be aware of your surroundings and stay alert to what's going on around you 
• Be careful with your electronics; talking on a mobile phone, listening to an MP3 player or carrying a laptop bag shows thieves that you have something to steal 
• Don't carry important documents or credit cards that you do not need 
• Only take your wallet out when you need to 
• If you think you are being followed, cross the road or go into a shop and stay there until you're sure you're safe 
 
Staying safe on public transport 
• If you are travelling by yourself and you know how to get home, using public transport is safer than walking. However, you should still use common sense to protect yourself. 
• If you are waiting for a bus or a train, stand in a well-lighted area near other people. Once you are on board, try and sit near other people and make sure you know where the emergency alarms are. 
• Don't be afraid to change seats or carriages if you feel unsafe, even if it seems rude to do so. 
 
Preventing personal theft 
• Be aware and keep your possessions safe: 
• Never leave your bags or other valuables unattended in public places 
• Be discreet with your belongings; displaying expensive jewellery or electronic devices, like mobile phones or cameras, could attract unwanted attention 
• The most common item stolen in a robbery is a mobile phone, so make sure you keep your phone safe. If you’re not making a call, keep your phone hidden away. Keep it in one of your front pockets or inside a bag 

PROTECT YOURSELF WHEN DOG WALKING 

 
Here are some basic hints and tips on staying safe while out dog walking, don’t be a target by practicing the following: 
• Walk strong and with purpose 
• Keep your head up high 
• Be aware of your surroundings 
• Stand up straight 
 
Being Attacked from Behind 
The most common angle of attack is from behind. Make it known in your demeanour that you will not be surprised from behind. As you walk, check all around you move your head to look side to side and behind you.  
 
Keep your Hands Free 
Have your personal protection equipment accessible, hands, ready for action. Do not be overloaded with leads, ball chucker’s or bags. Have one hand free to hold up between you and the criminal or to defend with. Hands full of leads, toys, bags increases your chances of distraction, which is just what a potential attacker is looking for. 
 
Walking Safely Near Traffic 
When walking with your dog be seen, wear light, bright or reflective clothing, Hi-Viz and reflective clothing is freely available in shops and on-line for the walker and their dogs. If wearing a florescent coat isn’t your thing get one for your dog. 
 
Walk toward the Traffic: Most people walk or run with traffic, which results in not being aware of a car or van coming up behind you before they stop, open the doors, and abduct or attack you.  
 
Rounding Corners 
Walk around corners wide, at least 3 feet away, you never know who is behind the corner, ready to surprise and jump you, let your dog walk in front as you approach the corner as your dog will know if someone is there before you and give you warning and unnerving a potential attacker. 
 
Dog Walking on the Pavement 
Walk down the centre of the pavements, away from walls and parked cars. This creates distance and time between you and potential threats from people waiting in alleys or behind parked cars. 
 
Walking with Music and Books 
We would not advise the use of headphones or reading as you walk with your dog, not only does it mean you cannot hear your dog if he needs you it also opens you to a potential attack. 
 
In Summary: 
• Always Carry a Fully Charged Mobile Phone and Identification 
• Consider Your Routine 
• Always Be Aware 
• Stay in Populated Areas 
• Carry a Self-Defence Product 

PROTECT YOUR SHED 

 
Tips for keeping your garden shed secure from intruders: 
 
• Before you start looking at locks and alarms for your garden shed, inspect the building itself. Is the roof in good shape, for example? Thieves have been known to lift off a flimsy roof to get at tools inside. 
• Make sure the shed door is in good condition – there’s no point strengthening hinges and fitting padlocks if it’s easy enough to kick in a rotting door panel. 
• Use clutch-head screws or coach screws on the shed door hinges and on the hasp and latch – these types of screws can’t be easily unscrewed. Fit two padlocks on the door: one about a third of the way down from the top, the other a similar distance from the bottom of the door. 
• Choose closed-shackle padlocks to make the shed door more secure – they have very little of the metal hoop exposed, which makes them much less vulnerable to someone wielding a pair of bolt cutters. 
• If your shed has a window, make it harder for thieves to find out what’s inside by obscuring it – cover it on the inside with bubblewrap, horticultural fleece or even an old net curtain. Fit laminated glass in the window – it’s harder to break – or fit security mesh across the outside. 
• If someone does manage to get into the shed, make it hard for them to carry off equipment such as lawnmowers and chainsaws. Use heavy-duty chain and a padlock to link items together: a lawnmower, a heavy barbecue and a bundle of garden chairs chained together will be awkward to drag away. 
• Does your garden shed have a concrete base? You could install anchor bolts and use a chain and padlock to secure equipment stored in your shed. 
• Always put away tools, equipment and bikes – anything of any value – when you aren’t using them. Be aware that burglars may find some garden tools handy for breaking into the house. 
• Mark equipment with your postcode – use a UV pen, paint the details on or scratch them onto metal handles. 
• In summer it can be a pain to have to put garden furniture every night – check whether your insurance policy covers items left out in the garden. 

PROTECT YOURSELF ONLINE 

 
There are a number of risks associated with going online – some general and some specific to the respective activities that you carry out: 
Although fraud comes in many forms, there are some simple steps you can take to protect yourself from the crime. 
 
1. Do not give any personal information (name, address, bank details, email or phone number) to organisations or people before verifying their credentials. 
 
2. Many frauds start with a phishing email. Remember that banks and financial institutions will not send you an email asking you to click on a link and confirm your bank details. Do not trust such emails, even if they look genuine. You can always call your bank using the phone number on a genuine piece of correspondence, website (typed directly into the address bar) or the phone book to check if you’re not sure. 
 
3. Destroy and preferably shred receipts with your card details on and post with your name and address on. Identity fraudsters don’t need much information in order to be able to clone your identity. 
 
4. Make sure your computer has up-to-date anti-virus software and a firewall installed. Ensure your browser is set to the highest level of security notification and monitoring to prevent malware issues and computer crimes. 
 
5. Sign-up to Verified by Visa or MasterCard Secure Code whenever you are given the option while shopping online. This involves you registering a password with your card company and adds an additional layer of security to online transactions with signed-up retailers. 
 
6. If you receive bills, invoices or receipts for things you haven’t bought, or financial institutions you don’t normally deal with contact you about outstanding debts, take action. Your identity may have been stolen. 
 
7. You should regularly get a copy of your credit file and check it for entries you don’t recognise. Callcredit, Equifax, Experian, ClearScore and Noddle can all provide your credit file. An identity protection service such as ProtectMyID monitors your Experian credit report and alerts you by email or SMS to potential fraudulent activity. If it's fraud, a dedicated caseworker will help you resolve everything. 
 
8. Be extremely wary of post, phone calls or emails offering you business deals out of the blue. If an offer seems too good to be true, it probably is. Always question it. 
 
9. If you have been a victim of fraud, be aware of fraud recovery fraud. This is when fraudsters pretend to be a lawyer or a law enforcement officer and tell you they can help you recover the money you’ve already lost. 
 
10. If you need advice about fraud, call Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 to discuss your situation with one of our specialist fraud advisers.  
 
11. Use complex passwords - People use easy to guess and similar passwords for the simple reason that they have too many and they can be hard to remember. 
 
12. Do not click on email links or attachments you do not recognise - Malware – a malicious piece of code - could get on your machine when you open an attachment or link. Clicking on unknown links may lead to “phishing” sites that harvest usernames and passwords. 
 
13. Pay attention to suspect emails as more and more hackers are getting sophisticated in the way they write them. 
Avoid clicking on pop-up windows. If we are generally aware about suspicious attachments, we might not think that closing a pop-up window might make us vulnerable to hacking. 
 
14. Check URLs - Hackers can harvest usernames and password using fake webpages designed to look like the ones you use, such as your bank or your Facebook account. 
 
15. Install a piece of anti-virus software or web application firewall. It is important to have a piece of security code on your machine, according to the expert. Most antivirus software automatically downloads updates on existing viruses and updates on new threats. 

FIRE SAFETY 

 
Hints and tips on fire prevention and safety: 
Protect your home from Fire 
The most common causes of these fires are chip pans, or smokers materials setting fire to upholstery, such as chairs and sofas. Here are a few fire prevention reminders: 
Chip pans 
• Never fill a pan more than one-third full of fat or oil. 
• Never leave the pan unattended when the heat is switched on. 
• If the pan does catch fire do not move it and never throw water on it. 
• Leave the room, close the door and call the fire brigade.  
Smoking 
• Never leave a lit cigarette or pipe unattended.  
• Never smoke in a chair if you think you may doze off in it. 
• Always keep matches and lighters well out of the reach of children. 
Cookers 
• Always make sure that saucepans are in a safe position on the cooker. Handles should not stick over the edge of the cooker, where they can be knocked over, or left within the reach of children. Make sure the handles are not over a hot ring or burner. Flexes from electrical equipment, such as kettles and toasters, should be kept well away from the cooker and tea towels should never be dried over the cooker. Never leave a saucepan unattended with the heat turned on and be especially careful when using chip pans with oil or fat. Make sure that ovens are not left on after use. 
Wiring 
• Look out for warning signs of dangerous wiring: 
• Hot plugs and sockets 
• Fuses that blow for no obvious reason 
• Lights flickering 
• Brown scorch marks on sockets and plugs 
• When ever possible have your electricity consumer box fitted with a Residual Current Circuit Breaker (RCCB) and if a fault develops on your wiring system then the electric supply will cut out. 
• House wiring usually is Red for Live, Black for neutral and earth is yellow and green sleeving. 
Electric Blankets 
• Many fires and deaths are due to electric blankets being left accidentally switched on. As with all electrical equipment, it is important that you follow the manufacturers instructions. Check the instructions to see if you should switch off your blanket when you get into bed. Under blankets should always be tied to the bed and be switched off before you get into bed. All electric blankets should be kept dry and flat. Once your electric blanket is out of guarantee, have it serviced once a year or in accordance with the manufacturers instructions. Check for scorch marks and if you are responsible for elderly people check regularly especially if they have a history of being incontinent. 
Open fires 
• Always put a spark fireguard in front of an open fire and if you have young children at home, make sure you use an all-enclosed guard as well. You should never rest clothes to dry or put newspaper on the guard as they will catch fire or get too hot to handle and could cause burns. All-enclosed Fireguards should be secured to the wall to prevent children from removing them or knocking them over. 
Portable Heaters 
• Make sure you don’t sit too close to a portable heater to keep warm. You could easily set light to your clothes or your chair; particularly if you fall asleep. Portable heaters should always stand in a safe place where they cant be knocked over and where they cannot be tripped over. They should be kept well away from furniture and soft furnishings, such as curtains and cushions. Do not position heaters where objects may fall onto them. Heaters should never be placed close to beds or used to dry clothes. As with open fires, make sure that all heaters are correctly guarded.  
Children 
• You should never leave children alone in a room where there are portable heaters, cookers or an open fire. Keep matches and lighters well out of their reach and never leave children alone in the house. 
Bedtime routine 
• Because many fires in the home happen at night it is important that you make a special check of all the danger spots mentioned in this leaflet before you go to bed. • Unplug all electric appliances not designed to stay on. 
• Make sure no cigarette, cigars or pipes are still burning. 
• Before emptying ashtrays make sure the contents are cold. 
• Put a guard around open fires. 
• Switch off all portable heaters. 

PROTECTION 

 
The ultimate protection for you and your family - feel empowered, safe in the knowledge your journeys are recorded....just in case! 
 
Protect your insurance costs with the ability to prove to your insurer that an accident was not your fault.  
 
Protect yourself from insurance scams such as 'Crash for Cash' and 'Flash for Cash’. 
 
Protect your vehicle - even whilst parked! No more unexplained bumps and scrapes in the car park - instead video evidence of those responsible. 
 
Dash cams can act as legal evidence they are a great way of providing legal evidence in driving cases that may involve you, other drivers, cyclists or even pedestrians. 
 
The GPS feature on a dash cam can come in handy in the event of an incident or accident. The GPS feature can record your co-ordinates, speed and route details for reference. 
 
A dash cam gives you the ability to prove your version of events. 
 
A dash cam will help you prove your innocence if wrongly accused. 

CHEAPER CAR INSURANCE 

PoliceWitness has secured the cheapest car insurance for our members. 
 
Important news - No gimmicks or marketing ploys, PoliceWitness.com has secured the cheapest car insurance for members using a dash cam in their vehicle. Guaranteed*. (*Quote is dependent on your post code as certain post codes carry a higher risk) 
 
Paying too much already? Don’t wait for your renewal, enquire today and you’ll save a fortune. Mr R recently reviewed the RAC dash cam and wrote: "The BEST part is actually their insurance tie up with Zenith. On comparison websites I was quoted £595 as the cheapest but due to the purchase of this camera from PoliceWitness.com I was quoted £450 and that is a saving of £145, which means the dash cam got paid itself. I would definitely recommend the camera and it would be worth getting a quote for insurance as well" 
 
This is a genuine benefit with genuine savings for those associated with PoliceWitness.com. 

BENEFITS OF JOINING POLICEWITNESS.COM 

 
There are 7 key areas (among others) where we focus to help the public and our members. Some of the benefits of POLICEWITNESS.COM Membership include: 
1) Camera recommendation  
2) Cheapest car insurance in the UK  
3) Reporting incidents  
4) Representing our members interests  
5) Members receive free access to the PoliceWitness Recognition Scheme  
6) Holding bad drivers to account  
7) Peace of mind  
 
Lastly, when buying a dash cam, please note no other dash cam supplier provides membership to our service. This is only available exclusively via PoliceWitness.com. 

MAKE MONEY FROM YOUR FOOTAGE 

 
Earn money from your footage. If you capture a third party incident on your dash cam, we can 'sell' your footage to the insurance companies to prove liability. 
 
Recently another happy member received £200 - Mrs Cohead said: "Having invested in a dash cam to protect my own motoring interests I am delighted that PoliceWitness secured me such a large sum of money when my camera caught a third party incident, thank you PoliceWitness". 

PROTECTION 

 
The ultimate protection for you and your family - feel empowered, safe in the knowledge your journeys are recorded....just in case! 
Protect your insurance costs with the ability to prove to your insurer that an accident was not your fault.  
 
Protect yourself from insurance scams such as 'Crash for Cash' and 'Flash for Cash’. 
 
Protect your vehicle - even whilst parked! No more unexplained bumps and scrapes in the car park - instead video evidence of those responsible. 
 
Dash cams can act as legal evidence they are a great way of providing legal evidence in driving cases that may involve you, other drivers, cyclists or even pedestrians. 
 
The GPS feature on a dash cam can come in handy in the event of an incident or accident. The GPS feature can record your co-ordinates, speed and route details for reference. 
 
A dash cam gives you the ability to prove your version of events. 
 
A dash cam will help you prove your innocence if wrongly accused. 

CHEAPER CAR INSURANCE 

PoliceWitness has secured the cheapest car insurance for our members. 
 
Important news - No gimmicks or marketing ploys, PoliceWitness.com has secured the cheapest car insurance for members using a dash cam in their vehicle. Guaranteed*. (*Quote is dependent on your post code as certain post codes carry a higher risk) 
 
Paying too much already? Don’t wait for your renewal, enquire today and you’ll save a fortune. Mr R recently reviewed the RAC dash cam and wrote: "The BEST part is actually their insurance tie up with Zenith. On comparison websites I was quoted £595 as the cheapest but due to the purchase of this camera from PoliceWitness.com I was quoted £450 and that is a saving of £145, which means the dash cam got paid itself. I would definitely recommend the camera and it would be worth getting a quote for insurance as well" 
 
This is a genuine benefit with genuine savings for those associated with PoliceWitness.com. 

BENEFITS OF JOINING POLICEWITNESS.COM 

 
There are 7 key areas (among others) where we focus to help the public and our members. Some of the benefits of POLICEWITNESS.COM Membership include: 
1) Camera recommendation  
2) Cheapest car insurance in the UK  
3) Reporting incidents  
4) Representing our members interests  
5) Members receive free access to the PoliceWitness Recognition Scheme  
6) Holding bad drivers to account  
7) Peace of mind  
 
Lastly, when buying a dash cam, please note no other dash cam supplier provides membership to our service. This is only available exclusively via PoliceWitness.com. 

MAKE MONEY FROM YOUR FOOTAGE 

 
Earn money from your footage. If you capture a third party incident on your dash cam, we can 'sell' your footage to the insurance companies to prove liability. 
 
Recently another happy member received £200 - Mrs Cohead said: "Having invested in a dash cam to protect my own motoring interests I am delighted that PoliceWitness secured me such a large sum of money when my camera caught a third party incident, thank you PoliceWitness". 
The 3 MOTORISTS BELOW didn't think they needed a dash cam but without the video evidence the 3 incidents below could have had very different outcomes: 
The HGV in front rolled backward 8ft and hit the car belonging to a member of PoliceWitness, whilst he sat in stand still traffic. Mr H said "it was a complete shock to see a vehicle traveling towards you on the motorway and I had no way to get out of the vehicle's path." 
 
The footage captured on the dash cam clearly shows that the member of PoliceWitness was not at fault and that the HGV was solely liable for the incident. Without this evidence, the insurance companies would have undoubtedly concluded that both drivers should share the liability 50/50 and our member would have had to make a claim on his insurance and potentially lost his no claims discount. 
The offending driver did not stop but fortunately the whole incident was captured on dash cam and our member was able to identify the offending vehicle to both the police and her insurance company. 
The car did not stop, instead it made off at speed down the road, where it performs another deadly manoeuvre at a busy junction. 
 
At court in North Wales the driver was not only imprisoned for 9 months, he was also fined, banned from driving for 2 years and will be required to sit and extended driving test before he is allowed back on the road. 

WHY YOU SHOULD OWN A DASH CAM 

Owning a dash cam is not just about protection and reducing your insurance costs, it’s also about using your dash cam to generate cash whilst empowering you to hold bad drivers to account with real police action. 
 
If you want to help make our roads and communities safer, get involved.  
 
To date, bad drivers have faced a raft of penalties from fines and points on their licences, through to driving bans and even imprisonment! 
 
Members of policewitness.com can actually make money from the footage their dash cams capture. In the event of witnessing a third party accident, our members are encouraged to exchange details with both parties who then leave the rest to us to negotiate fees of up to hundreds of pounds, in exchange for use of the video footage. Mrs Cohead, from the Midlands caught on her dash cam a 2 car collision near a supermarket and received £200 for just a few seconds of footage.  
Mrs Cohead, like all our members received 100% of the payment PoliceWitness negotiated. This one incident alone paid for her dash cam! How’s that for service? 
 
• Important news - PoliceWitness.com has secured the cheapest car insurance for members using a dash cam in their vehicle. Guaranteed*. This is not a marketing ploy where discounts are offered against already inflated premiums. This is a genuine benefit with genuine savings for those associated with PoliceWitness.com. (*cheaper car insurance is dependent on your postcode, as some postcodes carry a higher risk). 
 
• Our buying power means we can supply known brands and models at the lowest prices. Click here to view our range of dash cams. What’s more, being a member of PoliceWitness is completely optional, buy your dash cam with membership or without, it’s your choice. 

ACCIDENT REPRESENTATION SERVICE 

Please find below important instructions you MUST follow in the event of a collision with another motorist. No matter the severity, it is important you follow these instructions to ensure we are able to safeguard your excess, your no claims bonus, next year’s premium and any cash back negotiated. Please note, you must be a member to use this service. 
Following a collision (assuming a non-injury RTC*): 
 
1. Exchange details with the other motorist as per usual, DO NOT mention the incident has been recorded on your in-car camera. 
 
2. Notify your insurer in the usual way and complete the necessary paperwork. Most insurers now manage claims over the phone. 
 
3. Ensure you have completed our Letter of Authority – allowing us to act on your behalf. 
 
4. Make contact with our claims support team, by completing the Insurance Assistance form on our website. 
 
5. PoliceWitness.com will then contact your insurer – and tentatively make available the footage that proves the collision was not your fault. In doing so, saving the insurer money, yet at the same time negotiating cash back for you and/or a substantial reduction of next year’s, this includes safeguarding your excess and no claims bonus, even if it’s not protected. 

FITTING A DASH CAM 

The diagram below shows how quick and simple it is to fit a dash cam. The dash cam is hidden behind the mirror so does not cause a distraction. The wiring is hidden behind the trim of your car which makes a tidy install: 
The majority of dash cam owners simply place their in car camera behind the rear view mirror, and run the power supply (usually a nice 4 metres long so there’s plenty of cable) around the windscreen, down to the cars 12 volt power supply – or, the cigarette lighter. 
 
Alternatively, you can choose to hardwire or use a battery pack which means that the dash cam is always on. the dash cam in to your car. The advantage of this is that the dash cam will begin recording as it detects movement with the Motion Detection technology. It can be useful in the fight against vehicle vandalism, or if you are parked on a busy road whereby somebody else may hit your parked vehicle. 
 
There are two ways to do this – using a hard wire kit that is compatible with your dash cam or a Cellink Battery Pack (find out more here). 

LEGALITY OF FILMING  

What is the legality of filming whilst I drive? 
It is perfectly legal to film or take photos whilst in a public place, which when we consider the activities of tourists and the paparazzi, it’s actually quite obvious – but to give this right to film and photograph even further context, people will be surprised to learn that we can even film and record our interactions with a police officer, should we feel the need or wish to have a record of the conversation. 
 
There are actually very few exceptions to what is in essence a blanket right to film whilst in a public place. One of note is aggressive or persistent filming of an individual which in criminal law could amount to harassment. 
 
Other laws exist pertaining to the use of footage and/or photos which may be used to facilitate an act of terrorism, but in the main this of course doesn’t apply to the average motorist. 
 
So, now that we’re safe in the knowledge we can film in a public place, we obviously have no issue with filming our journeys as we go about our daily business. However the points to consider when installing a dash cam are firstly - its location - because it must not obstruct your view in any way, our recommendation would be to mount the camera high and behind your rear view mirror, allowing you to tuck the power lead around the roof lining so it’s not visible. 
 
It’s important that the dash cam you choose has the ability to start recording automatically when you start your engine. For obvious reasons you certainly don’t want to be fiddling with buttons and re-positioning a camera whilst you’re driving, so making the right camera selection is key. 
 
With safety in mind, any distraction can potentially be dangerous which is why in the past the police have successfully prosecuted a number of drivers for offences ranging from ‘Not being in proper control of vehicle’ through to careless driving for anything from eating a chocolate bar through to applying make-up. 
 
Could the footage be used against me? 
That depends on what you’ve done - for example if you are drunk at the wheel, mount a pavement and kill someone, yes, the police would have a power following your arrest to search your car in order to gather any evidence that could help with a prosecution…however the police do not have sweeping powers that enable them to seize your property at a whim, and you are under no obligation to hand it over, even if they ask nicely! 
 
If we look at some other scenarios, we’ll assume you are a normal, careful and considerate driver, but due to a momentary lapse of concentration, you go through a changing traffic light, which you believe was still amber, but 100 meters down the road you are pulled over by police. Could the footage captured by your dash cam be seized by the police and used against you in that circumstance? No certainly not - In this circumstance the police have no power to search, seize or request any property from your vehicle whatsoever. 
 
Let’s take another scenario, a car is pulled over for a routine check, after the officer thought the driver might have been going a bit too quick for his liking – upon opening the window the officer smells what he believes is an illegal substance. He now has a power to search the occupants and the vehicle for that substance; however his or her search must be specific, and does not extend to the images recorded on the driver’s dash cam. 
 
In summary then, during the normal course of responsible driving, the police are unable to use footage from your dash cam in a bid to prosecute you for a minor road traffic offence. That said if the police were of the mind, they could seek a court order to obtain the images, however as most dash cams loop record due to limited space on the memory card, it’s likely any evidence they were looking for has been recorded over by that time. 

WHY YOU SHOULD OWN A DASH CAM 

Owning a dash cam is not just about protection and reducing your insurance costs, it’s also about using your dash cam to generate cash whilst empowering you to hold bad drivers to account with real police action. 
 
If you want to help make our roads and communities safer, get involved.  
 
To date, bad drivers have faced a raft of penalties from fines and points on their licences, through to driving bans and even imprisonment! 
 
Members of policewitness.com can actually make money from the footage their dash cams capture. In the event of witnessing a third party accident, our members are encouraged to exchange details with both parties who then leave the rest to us to negotiate fees of up to hundreds of pounds, in exchange for use of the video footage. Mrs Cohead, from the Midlands caught on her dash cam a 2 car collision near a supermarket and received £200 for just a few seconds of footage.  
Mrs Cohead, like all our members received 100% of the payment PoliceWitness negotiated. This one incident alone paid for her dash cam! How’s that for service? 
 
• Important news - PoliceWitness.com has secured the cheapest car insurance for members using a dash cam in their vehicle. Guaranteed*. This is not a marketing ploy where discounts are offered against already inflated premiums. This is a genuine benefit with genuine savings for those associated with PoliceWitness.com. (*cheaper car insurance is dependent on your postcode, as some postcodes carry a higher risk). 
 
• Our buying power means we can supply known brands and models at the lowest prices. Click here to view our range of dash cams. What’s more, being a member of PoliceWitness is completely optional, buy your dash cam with membership or without, it’s your choice. 

ACCIDENT REPRESENTATION SERVICE 

Please find below important instructions you MUST follow in the event of a collision with another motorist. No matter the severity, it is important you follow these instructions to ensure we are able to safeguard your excess, your no claims bonus, next year’s premium and any cash back negotiated. Please note, you must be a member to use this service. 
Following a collision (assuming a non-injury RTC*): 
 
1. Exchange details with the other motorist as per usual, DO NOT mention the incident has been recorded on your in-car camera. 
 
2. Notify your insurer in the usual way and complete the necessary paperwork. Most insurers now manage claims over the phone. 
 
3. Ensure you have completed our Letter of Authority – allowing us to act on your behalf. 
 
4. Make contact with our claims support team, by completing the Insurance Assistance form on our website. 
 
5. PoliceWitness.com will then contact your insurer – and tentatively make available the footage that proves the collision was not your fault. In doing so, saving the insurer money, yet at the same time negotiating cash back for you and/or a substantial reduction of next year’s, this includes safeguarding your excess and no claims bonus, even if it’s not protected. 

FITTING A DASH CAM 

The diagram below shows how quick and simple it is to fit a dash cam. The dash cam is hidden behind the mirror so does not cause a distraction. The wiring is hidden behind the trim of your car which makes a tidy install: 
The majority of dash cam owners simply place their in car camera behind the rear view mirror, and run the power supply (usually a nice 4 metres long so there’s plenty of cable) around the windscreen, down to the cars 12 volt power supply – or, the cigarette lighter. 
 
Alternatively, you can choose to hardwire or use a battery pack which means that the dash cam is always on. the dash cam in to your car. The advantage of this is that the dash cam will begin recording as it detects movement with the Motion Detection technology. It can be useful in the fight against vehicle vandalism, or if you are parked on a busy road whereby somebody else may hit your parked vehicle. 
 
There are two ways to do this – using a hard wire kit that is compatible with your dash cam or a Cellink Battery Pack (find out more here). 

LEGALITY OF FILMING  

What is the legality of filming whilst I drive? 
It is perfectly legal to film or take photos whilst in a public place, which when we consider the activities of tourists and the paparazzi, it’s actually quite obvious – but to give this right to film and photograph even further context, people will be surprised to learn that we can even film and record our interactions with a police officer, should we feel the need or wish to have a record of the conversation. 
 
There are actually very few exceptions to what is in essence a blanket right to film whilst in a public place. One of note is aggressive or persistent filming of an individual which in criminal law could amount to harassment. 
 
Other laws exist pertaining to the use of footage and/or photos which may be used to facilitate an act of terrorism, but in the main this of course doesn’t apply to the average motorist. 
 
So, now that we’re safe in the knowledge we can film in a public place, we obviously have no issue with filming our journeys as we go about our daily business. However the points to consider when installing a dash cam are firstly - its location - because it must not obstruct your view in any way, our recommendation would be to mount the camera high and behind your rear view mirror, allowing you to tuck the power lead around the roof lining so it’s not visible. 
 
It’s important that the dash cam you choose has the ability to start recording automatically when you start your engine. For obvious reasons you certainly don’t want to be fiddling with buttons and re-positioning a camera whilst you’re driving, so making the right camera selection is key. 
 
With safety in mind, any distraction can potentially be dangerous which is why in the past the police have successfully prosecuted a number of drivers for offences ranging from ‘Not being in proper control of vehicle’ through to careless driving for anything from eating a chocolate bar through to applying make-up. 
 
Could the footage be used against me? 
That depends on what you’ve done - for example if you are drunk at the wheel, mount a pavement and kill someone, yes, the police would have a power following your arrest to search your car in order to gather any evidence that could help with a prosecution…however the police do not have sweeping powers that enable them to seize your property at a whim, and you are under no obligation to hand it over, even if they ask nicely! 
 
If we look at some other scenarios, we’ll assume you are a normal, careful and considerate driver, but due to a momentary lapse of concentration, you go through a changing traffic light, which you believe was still amber, but 100 meters down the road you are pulled over by police. Could the footage captured by your dash cam be seized by the police and used against you in that circumstance? No certainly not - In this circumstance the police have no power to search, seize or request any property from your vehicle whatsoever. 
 
Let’s take another scenario, a car is pulled over for a routine check, after the officer thought the driver might have been going a bit too quick for his liking – upon opening the window the officer smells what he believes is an illegal substance. He now has a power to search the occupants and the vehicle for that substance; however his or her search must be specific, and does not extend to the images recorded on the driver’s dash cam. 
 
In summary then, during the normal course of responsible driving, the police are unable to use footage from your dash cam in a bid to prosecute you for a minor road traffic offence. That said if the police were of the mind, they could seek a court order to obtain the images, however as most dash cams loop record due to limited space on the memory card, it’s likely any evidence they were looking for has been recorded over by that time.